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Monday, October 05, 2009

Monday Matters

Wanted to take a few moments to call a couple of things to your attention.

REPUBLICANS  are threatening  Net-neutrality.

As federal regulators prepare to vote this month on  "network neutrality,”, twenty House Republicans — including most of the Republicans on the House Energy and Commerce Committee — sent a letter to Federal Communications Chairman Julius Genachowski today urging him to delay the Oct. 22 vote on his plan.  The neutrality plan would prohibit broadband providers from favoring or discriminating against certain types of Internet traffic. Broadband providers would like to regulate the speed at which sites load for customers. They would for instance like give preference to their own site and perhaps create premium commercial sites that would have speed preferences.

On the  Senate side, , Kay Bailey Hutchinson of Texas, is considering legislation that would prohibit the FCC from developing Net neutrality.

What is it with these people that they want to stick it to consumers and provide another windfall for corporations?

A LITTLE GOOD NEWS FOR POETRY IN A BAD ECONOMY

The Dodge Poetry Festival started in 1986 as an initiative funded by the Arts and Education Programs of the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation.  The biennial even easily has attracted close to 20,000 participants to each of the 12 events.  But the economic downturn brought news that the festival would be cancelled for 2010.  In what may be the best Arts related  economic news so for this year, Dodge decided to resurrect the popular event -- the largest poetry gathering in the country.  The 2010 event will move to a more urban setting as it was announced that the festival will encompass the performance spaces at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center as well as at least two local churches, the New Jersey Historical Society and parts of Military Park.

The good news come just a year before the event is to occur. It was January when the word came that the 2010 event would be put in ice. The 2008 event cost about $1.3 million to produce. The Foundation had lost considerable equity in investments, nearly 30% during the recession last fall and winter and the latest development is exciting news.

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